A sign commemorating the naming and dedication of "Quincy's Field" in Cascade Pichon, Haiti. Photo by Shay Foster.A sign commemorating the naming and dedication of "Quincy's Field" in Cascade Pichon, Haiti. Photo by Shay Foster.

Junior Regan Wertz recounted the excitement of that day. When the first goal was made, the crowd went crazy. They screamed and chanted and jumped around, ecstatic. There were hundreds of them, crammed onto bright blue bleachers and surrounding the field.

“The kids had a net to catch the ball. They didn’t have to run after it anymore,” Wertz said.

This trip was Wertz’ first time to Haiti, and she said that the country was one of the most beautiful places she’d ever seen, describing how the mountains and the beach collided into one another.

Senior Annie Huff visited Haiti this past July and said the area where the soccer field now stands was a jungle; hilly and overcome with trees and rocks. This past July, a group traveled to Cascade Pichon to begin the work of building the soccer field to commemorate the life of Quincy Foster.

Returning to Haiti in December, Huff was amazed at the change. “The land was actually flat. There were no boulders, no trees. The people in Haiti had done a lot of the work,” Huff said.

Freshman Shay Foster, brother of Quincy, explained that this flat surface is much more than a soccer field to these people, but is instead seen as a community center, a place for everyone to meet and hang out, something Cascade Pichon had never had before. The land will also be used as a landing area for helicopters coming in, which were previously forced to land miles away. Foster said that since the town’s needs for food and water had been met for a while, this humanitarian work was an effort to improve the social life of the community.

“This is not necessarily a need to survive, but it is a need to live, to enjoy life,” Foster said.

Haitian children play soccer at the newly-finished "Quincy's Field" in Cascade Pichon, Haiti. The field is named in memoriam of Quincy Foster, an MNU student who died on Jan. 1, 2015. Photo by Shay Foster.Haitian children play soccer at the newly-finished "Quincy's Field" in Cascade Pichon, Haiti. The field is named in memoriam of Quincy Foster, an MNU student who died on Jan. 1, 2015. Photo by Shay Foster.

Both Foster and Huff travelled to Haiti in July, and Foster said he was amazed that the people remembered them when they returned.

“They are so big on relationships and remembering people," Foster said. "I had nine kids who remembered my name, and I’d been there once six months ago.”

Sixteen people went on the trip in January, including members of the MNU community, the Foster family, and Heart to Heart International staff.

Huff recounted sitting on the stands and reflecting on how much has changed in a year as games were played on the anniversary of Quincy Foster's passing.

“The community made this disaster something that God could be glorified through,” Huff said.

When reflecting on what Quincy would have thought of the game, Huff smiled.

“As that first game was going on, the Haitian people were cheering and doing all these chants and I was sitting in the middle of all that,” Huff said. “And I was thinking, this would blow her mind, that this was even happening, that this was a reality.”