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Britney Lewis

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October 29, 2013

A Mummy Like You

October 29, 2013 | By | No Comments

Blog world!

In the spirit of Halloween, I have written a short story for you to enjoy!

Remember, be safe this Halloween!

Till Next time,

Love,

Britney

supercompressed_halloween-header-no-text

A Mummy Like You- By Britney Lewis

  I grabbed my jacket, brushed my brown hair into a ponytail, and climbed out my bedroom window in hopes to avoid confrontation with my parents. I was on my way to Whisper Creek’s hill in anticipation to see Caesarion’s spirit at midnight in the mausoleum. Caesarion was the son of Cleopatra VII and Julius Caesar. When he was seventeen, he was murdered by the current ruler, Octavian, out of fear that he’d lose his place as king. Old and mummified, Caesarion’s corpse was discovered a few years ago, and the museum in my city was granted the honor to keep his body on display. It is said that the mausoleum, a few ways down the road from the museum, has Caesarion’s spirit attached to it; and at midnight, on All Hallow’s Eve, under the skylight in the mausoleum, Caesarion comes back to earth for exactly three minutes and forty-five seconds. I didn’t believe the rumors at first, but after hours of YouTube videos on my laptop, I decided to check it out for myself. Not only will I be able to see a seventeen-year-old Egyptian boy from 30 BC, but I could videotape the sighting and turn it into my school’s contest for scariest video of all time. Not to mention, if I won, I’d have enough money to buy the new iPhone I’ve been waiting for.

When I made it to the catacombs, on top of Whisper Creek’s Hill, I entered the building with a confident heart. I wasn’t afraid of the experience I would face in the near future. After all, my name was Adira, and when translated from Hebrew, it means strong.

 I pushed the doors open, and a powerful wind filled with debris slapped me hard in the face. I struggled to breathe through a few coughs, and I fanned the air in front of me. The inside of the mausoleum was small, dark, and cold, but the skylight wasn’t too far from where I was. Out of precaution, I grabbed the flashlight I had packed in my backpack and turned it on.

The longer I walked down the hallway, the more I felt like the stone walls were closing in on me. I clung onto my arms and focused on my breathing. Everything will be okay, I thought. I’m just overreacting.

The floor moaned and creaked as I tip-toed down it, and the blood in my heart began to pump twice as fast. My fear was growing with every step I took closer to the skylight.

When I arrived to the center of the mausoleum, I opened my backpack and retrieved my camera. I sat it up in the corner of the room, next to one of the old walls. From this angle, the camera would catch everything in sight.

I checked the time on my wrist before I started the stop watch. It was exactly midnight which meant that Caesarion would be here in any minute…

While I waited under the skylight, the bright moon shun throughout the center of the mausoleum, enlightening the place with its creepy luminosity, and the trees outside filled the room with a plethora of shadows that played with my imagination. I thought the trees were trying to tell me something with their scrawny arms casted on the walls. Maybe they were warning me to leave…or maybe they were nothing more than shadows, and my mind was playing tricks on me.

I rubbed my cold palms together and checked the time again: sixty seconds had passed. Was it me, or did the temperature in here drop below freezing? I could see my breath as my breathing kicked it up a notch, and I began to waddle from side to side to get the blood flowing through my veins again.

As I turned around to face my camera, I smelt something strange. The room reeked of rotting eggs and raw meat. Covering my nose, I checked the time again. This time, three minutes had passed.

I huffed. “This is so stupid.” I mumbled. Why did I decide to come up here anyway? It was freezing, this placed smelt of the dead, and there was obviously no mummy spirit anywhere!

Whilst I retrieved my camera, and shoved it back into my book bag, I heard the tiles creek in the hall behind me. I glanced over at it, squinting my eyes so I could see in the dark, but there was nothing there. I shrug my shoulders. Oh, well. If the mummy isn’t going to come, then he can stay in this filthy place forever. I thought, as I zipped up my backpack.

I reached for my flashlight before I entered the hall that would take me back outside, but it wasn’t in my back pocket where I had placed it. I then scrambled though my book bag, but it wasn’t there either. I must have left it on the floor, under the skylight.

As I reentered the center of the mausoleum, I was stopped in my place. I kid you not, under the skylight, holding my flash light, was the mummy of Caesarion.

My jaw dropped, and my eyes grew with mystification. Holy cow! Was this actually happening right now? Was I witnessing the spirit of freaking mummy?!?!

I took my back pack off slowly, trying not to draw attention to myself while I looked for my camera. Once I had the camera in my hands, it slipped through my grasp, creating a noise that was loud enough to let Caesarion know that he was no longer alone.

I looked up slowly, terrified that something bad would happen, and when my eyes reached the center of the room, Caesarion was no where to be found.

I sighed in relief. His three minutes and forty-five seconds had been up, so his spirit must have vanished. As always, I had the worst timing.

As I stuffed my camera back into my bag for the last time, I was knocked off my feet by a piercing yell coming from behind me. Caesarion had never left, and as I scrambled to get to my feet, he was charging toward me.

Flustered and afraid that I’d lose my life, I ran to the opposite side of the room—this was about the same time when I declared my idea, to come to Whisper’s Creek, stupid. I should have stayed at home like all the other sixteen-year-olds.I could be warm and cozy in my bed, but instead, I’ve decided to risk my life for a brand, new IPhone–this is so not worth it.

My knees knocked together, and I was trembling all over. Dang it, Adira. This has got to be the stupidest idea in all of humanity!

Cornered into a wall, with no place to run, the mummy came closer to me. In order to protect myself from this “thing,”  I began flinging objects at him. I threw my camera, the watch I had on my wrist, and even a granola bar, but somehow, he managed to dodge everything I threw. What the heck? He was like some supernatural, ninja-mummy of the living dead.

Caesarion’s lifeless body trampled toward me, and with the light of the moon, I could see his eyes glistening. They weren’t the eyes that I was expecting; they didn’t seem dead or corroded, they were tantalizing. I was finding myself, oddly, paralyzed by this mummy’s gaze. How was this possible? How could something dead seem so undead…?

With my life hanging on the edge, I knew I would die soon. Caesarion was a foot away from me with his arms hanging low, and his head cocked to the side. Before he came any closer, he unraveled the cloth from his body, unveiling an enchanting silhouette of a teenage boy.

I cupped my mouth with both of my hands. How could this be? How is his body still intact, and why…why was he so beautiful?

Caesarion took another step toward me, smiling at me now. His short, black hair was perfectly groomed, and his teeth were whiter than mine. The dimple in the side of his smile lines was perfectly carved into his cheek, and when he pulled his lips into a smirk, his wide, hazel eyes, grew with excitement; the light danced in them, and they seemed softer than the cotton in my pillow case.

Caesarion leaned toward me, and when he did, I no longer felt afraid. He looked helpless, and I couldn’t help but smile at his current existence.

Then he whispered, with an accent as thick the sea.  “Welcome back, Adira. I’ve been waiting for your return for almost an eternity.” He grinned, captivating my soul with every consecrated word he spoke.