RN-MSN Program888.992.3869

RN-MSN program at MidAmerica Nazarene University

RN-MSN

School of Nursing and Health Science

The RN-MSN degree at MidAmerica Nazarene University is designed especially for the high-achiever. Complete your BSN and MSN at your own pace with a single plan of study in as little as two years.

This accelerated program allows you to take selected graduate and undergraduate courses at the same time in a condensed format that saves both time and money. Continue to grow as a servant leader at MNU.

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September 2013

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"I want my life to be full of meaning and purpose - both of which MNU helped me create through the Master of Science in Nursing program."

-Sarah Miller
MSN, RN

 
 
Overview
Cost
Requirements
Courses
Professors
Additional Info
?
 

Overview:

  • Complete both degrees in as little as two years or at your own pace at our Olathe campus and Online.
  • One application for two degrees.
  • Significant cost savings by completing two degrees at once.
  • Professors are experienced, highly dedicated nursing professionals.

Upcoming Start Dates

Online: September 3, 2013
Olathe: September 5, 2013

 

Bachelor's Course Sequences and Descriptions

plusaNursing Theories and Concepts (3 credit hours)

This course introduces the RN-BSN students to the theoretical bases of nursing practice and nursing theory, research, practice connection. The seven student outcomes/nursing concepts in MidAmerica's Division of Nursing are explored: Spiritual Development, Self-Understanding, Critical Thinking, Effective Communication, Social Responsibility, Scientific Literacy, and Aesthetic Literacy. The student develops a portfolio demonstrating his/her current level of proficiency in each of these outcomes. This portfolio is developed further in the following semesters and becomes a requirement for graduation.

plusaWellness and Spirituality in Nursing (3 credit hours)

This course is designed to foster appreciation of the components and life-long benefits of personal holistic wellness. Specific topics include: gaining an expansive overview of health (i.e., "to make whole"), from historical, present day, and future-oriented perspectives; assessment of strengths and weaknesses related to personal wellbeing; progressive strategies to support holistic wellness, including knowledge of health promotion theories; practical applications and tools for personal spiritual formation; and analysis of current research regarding wellness-related issues. Personal holistic wellness is viewed as the foundation from which to promote health in the people and populations served through professional nursing practice. A component of the course is built upon the theme, "Spirituality in Nursing: Standing on Holy Ground." Through this premise students are challenged to appreciate nursing as a personal ministry, to view patient interactions as privileged encounters, and finally to value the process of partnering with others on the sacred journey of holistic wellness and 'making whole'.

plusaProbability and Statistics (3 credit hours)

A course in elementary probability theory designed with a core which is common to the interests of students in nursing. Includes: measures of central tendency, standard deviation, sampling theory, and correlation theory.

plusaBiblical Perspectives (3 credit hours)

The course reflects MidAmerica Nazarene University's commitment, as a Christian liberal arts university, to nurturing an appreciation for the rich resources of the Scriptures. Cultural, societal, and biblical themes are explored through the study of the literature and history of the Bible. Students study the development of five major themes throughout the Bible and examine biblical concepts as they relate to current professional issues and the integration of faith, learning, and living.

plusaRole Development (3 credit hours)

The course focuses on students' development as leaders, designers/managers/coordinators of care, and as members of the nursing profession. Emphasis is on enabling students to shape a preferred future in health care situations. Current issues in health care and in the nursing profession are discussed. Student will complete a maximum of 12 hours outside of class time with a chosen mentor in a management role.

plusaHealth Promotion for the Individual/Family/Community (3 credit hours)

This course investigates the health promotional aspects of nursing care across the lifespan. Students will develop knowledge and skills in helping clients and families make responsible decisions that will promote optimal physical, psychosocial, and spiritual wellness. The health care system related to community-based care will be introduced. Students will complete an assessment and develop a program plan to meet the actual or potential health problems for the community they select. Through the science of epidemiology, students will examine world health problems. Health care systems in developed and underdeveloped countries will be examined.

plusaHealth Care Economics (3 credit hours)

The course is designed to provide a foundation for the analysis of the current state of health care organizations, financing, and delivery of services. Emphasis is on examining national and global health care needs and social justice in relationship to health care systems and policy. The utilization of informatics to manage and communicate data, information, and knowledge to support clients, nurses, and other health care providers also is addressed.

plusaEthical Issues in Healthcare (3 credit hours)

The course explores the theories, models, and principles that serve as guides for ethically sound decision making and behavior of the professional nurse. The role that values, beliefs systems, and moral awareness play in bioethical decision making will be discussed.

plusaNursing Research (3 credit hours)

This course is designed to develop students' knowledge of the research process; to increase their appreciation of the significance of nursing research and evidence based practice; in developing sound nursing practice; to help them develop skills to become astute consumers of nursing research; and to apply their knowledge of the research process in nursing practice. Students will be introduced to computer applications that facilitate the research process such as in literature reviews and data analysis.

plusaSpecial Topics in Nursing (6 credit hours)

The course offers advanced study in a specialized area of nursing. Students will be notified of choices available.

*Students may test out of these classes.

Master's Course Descriptions

Graduate Nursing Core Curriculum Taken by All Master's Students

plusaTheoretical Foundations of Nursing Practice (3 credit hours)

Presents the study and application of theory as the foundational guide to scholarly nursing practice, while introducing the nesting relationships between theory, research and practice. A wide range of theories (nursing as well as others) are presented to encourage the development of a comprehensive and holistic Christian approach to health care. The nature of nursing’s unique scientific body of knowledge will be emphasized.

plusaResearch in Nursing (3 credit hours)

Emphasizes the necessity of research as the basis of scholarly nursing inquiry which produces evidence-based practice. Compares qualitative and quantitative research methodology from the perspectives of purpose, design, method and analysis, focusing on quantitative design. Discusses informed consent and ethical issues related to research. Prepares students to evaluate research design, scientific merit, findings, and potential application to practice. Since an expectation of scholarship is to disseminate knowledge, the student will demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate the evaluation of research findings for the development of evidence-based practice.

plusaEmerging Trends in Healthcare Delivery: Systems, Ethics, Policy and Politics (3 credit hours)

Prepares graduates with the knowledge necessary to assume leadership roles in the management of human, fiscal, and physical health care resources. The organization of health care delivery systems and the resulting impacts are evaluated from historical, political, ethical, and economic viewpoints. Healthcare reimbursement and potential changes in payment structures are explored. The procedures and processes for policy development at the national through facility level are analyzed. The students are challenged to explore their personal value systems and to analyze how these values shape their professional practices.

plusaHealth Promotion for a Global Society (3 credit hours)

Identifies and explores the influence of biologic, environmental and societal factors on health and wellness of individuals, families and communities. Emphasizes the study of personal and community-based interventions and strategies to influence the goal of health promotion and disease prevention. Considers the use of theory, research, resources, social policies and regulatory requirements as avenues to promote health from a personal, community and global perspective. Included in this course is the role of spirituality as a component of health promotion and holistic nursing practice. Students are introduced to practical applications and tools for spiritual formation, while exploring the idea of professional nursing as ministry through vocation. The student is encouraged to appreciate a multi-faceted workforce in health care organization and delivery to stimulate positive societal and global outcomes. Related issues associated with the rapidly expanding aging population, human diversity, cultural sensitivity and global awareness are also included.

Direct Care Core Curriculum Taken by Nursing Education and Public Health Track Students

plusaAdvanced Health Assessment (3 credit hours)

Provides a systematic and holistic approach of advanced assessment skills to evaluate physiological, psychological, sociocultural, developmental, and spiritual conditions of individuals across the lifespan. This course builds upon basic health assessment knowledge and skills, emphasizing advanced assessment skills, laboratory work interpretation, validation, documentation, and analysis of assessment findings.

plusaAdvanced Pathophysiology and Pharmacotherapeutics (3 credit hours)

Focuses on the development of an in-depth scientific knowledge base relevant to selected pathophysiological conditions across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on linking this advanced knowledge base to the formulation of clinical decisions needed in primary health care management as related to diagnostic tests, pharmacotherapeutics, and the initiation of therapeutic regimens.

Nursing Education Functional Area Content Courses

plusaTheoretical Foundations of Learning and Teaching (3 credit hours)

Explores the roles of both educator and student in the creation of an effective learning environment. Frameworks for analyzing pedagogical philosophies, adult learning theories, ethical/legal issues, research, and professional values related to nursing education are examined. The incorporation of Christian teachings into nursing education and various other teaching strategies are explored. Also presented are the influences of accreditation and/or certification requirements, as well as the implementation of innovations and technologies in nursing education.

plusaCurriculum Design, and Teaching Strategies (3 credit hours)

Emphasizes curriculum development, outcomes, and competencies while focusing on effective teaching strategies. Evaluates the faculty role, the social responsibility of program curricular design, and pedagogies in meeting consumer and community needs, as well as professional nursing standards. Presents best practices and research-based strategies to promote various learning styles and encourage the creation of active learning environments that increase student retention and learning success for diverse student populations.

plusaAssessment of Student Learning (3 credit hours)

Provides students with an opportunity to compare, question, and analyze various assessment and evaluation concepts, models, and frameworks for their applicability in the quality assurance process of curriculum and program development. Explores techniques to evaluate learner knowledge and competence. Methods of curricula and program evaluation are explored. Students consider innovations in the area of evaluation based on current theories and practice.

plusaClinical Education, Simulation and Technology (3 credit hours)

Explores the unique aspects of clinical teaching, as well as theories and trends that support the use of technology for the enhancement of learning. Focuses on developing the education specialist’s skill set to be able to select and implement appropriate instructional technologies, including simulation and the electronic health record, to enhance learning in a variety of settings.

plusaApplied Research in Nursing Education (3 credit hours)

Integrates the knowledge, skills, and education expertise gained throughout the MSN course of study in a cumulative research project that examines evidence-based practice in one area of nursing education, documents how this best practice could be actualized in the educational setting, and how its implementation and results would be measured and analyzed. Also provides the student with the opportunity to visualize a specific project/ implementation and to evaluate it to gain a broader worldview and vision within nursing education. This course is taken during the last semester of the MSN program and is a prerequisite for Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing Education Practicum.

plusaEvidence-Based Practice in Nursing Education Practicum (3 credit hours)

Integrates the knowledge, skills, and education expertise gained throughout the MSN course of study to culminate in this practice experience designed to further polish the nurse educator’s professional role and skill set. The faculty and preceptor provide support and guidance to help interpret learning experiences, and to gain a broader worldview within an educational framework. Emphasis is on the capacity of the emerging leader and educator to implement evidence-based education, work with a preceptor and faculty member to apply current theories, and to realize effective strategies in the design, implementation, and evaluation of teaching experiences. Students negotiate an educational project to be completed during the practice experience. This course is completed during the student’s final module of MSN matriculation.

Public Health Functional Area Content Courses
(All Public Health Students Take These Courses Plus the Courses in One Emphasis Area)

plusaFoundations of Public Health (3 credit hours)

Explores the history, philosophy, and evolution of current public health practices, including the organization of public health systems, organizations, and practices in the United States. Presents public health requirements and statutes, and laws that affect public health agencies. Identifies opportunities for public health growth and the development of interface between public health and other health-related systems.

plusaFundamentals of Epidemiology (3 credit hours)

Presents the foundations for understanding and applying the basic principles and methods used in epidemiology including disease measures, association and causation, bias, confounding and modification effects, and susceptibility. Explores effective methods to design and conduct epidemiologic studies used to address public health problems. Prepares students to become a critical reader of epidemiologic literature, by evaluating study design, data collection methods, study limitations and applicability to additional populations.

plusaHealthcare Informatics, Database Management, and Financial Reimbursement (3 credit hours)

Provides an overview of healthcare informatics and its current use by both public and private healthcare agencies. Teaches students to navigate and enter data into complex healthcare databases using the principles of database management including the ability to conduct population studies through the use of databases. Explores the interpretation and evaluation of quality indicators within databases to maximize reimbursement in a variety of settings.

plusaApplied Research in Public Health (3 credit hours)

Integrates the knowledge, skills, and public health expertise gained throughout the MSN course of study in a cumulative research project that examines evidence-based practice in the emphasis area of public health, documents how this best practice could be actualized in the public health setting, and how it implementation and results would be measured and analyzed. Also provides the student with the opportunity to visualize a specific project/implementation and to evaluate it to gain a broader worldview and vision within public health. This course is taken during the last semester of the MSN program and is a prerequisite for Evidence-Based Practice in Public Health Practicum.

plusaEvidence-Based Practice in Public Health Practicum (3 credit hours)

Integrates the knowledge, skills, and public health experience gained throughout the MSN course of study to culminate in this practice experience designed to further polish the public health nurses professional role and skill set. The faculty and preceptor provide support and guidance to help interpret learning experiences, and to gain a broader worldview within a public health framework. Emphasis is on the capacity of the emerging leader and public health professional to implement evidence-based public health initiatives. The work will incorporate the application of current theories, and to realize effective strategies in the design, implementation, and evaluation of this initiative while working with a preceptor and faculty advisor. Professional issues, public health trends, technological competencies, and self-assessment are incorporated into the course. This course is taken during the last semester of the MSN program after Applied Research in Public Health.

Emphasis in School Nursing Functional Area Content Coursess

plusaHealthcare in the Academic Environment (3 credit hours)

Topics are presented that are unique in the provision of healthcare to minors in the academic environment. These include care of the chronically ill child, care of the child with co-morbidities, and providing healthcare education to children in the academic environment. The nurse’s role in the development of Individual Educational Plans for exceptional children is explored as is providing childhood education to children who are hospitalized, homebound, or otherwise unable to attend school in the classroom environment. Legal aspects of providing school nursing are addressed including principles of confidentiality and abuse or neglect reporting.

plusaTheoretical Foundations of Childhood Education (3 credit hours)

Explores contemporary philosophical and theoretical foundations of childhood education. Presents various age-specific teaching strategies that may used to educate K-12 students with corresponding methods of learning evaluation. Alternative teaching strategies that may be used to educate children with special needs, (such as those with diagnoses of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, autism, Asperger’s syndrome, obsessive compulsive disorder, and various learning disabilities) are investigated as are best-practices in childhood education.

Emphasis in Occupational Health Functional Area Content Coursess

plusaOccupational Safety and Health Management (3 credit hours)

The course builds on previous nursing courses and focuses on theory and skills to develop preventive health and occupational safety. Emphasis will be on understanding history as well as legal and regulatory issues outlined by OSHA and industry standards. Focus will be on understanding and applying safety principles through protective techniques, administrative practices, study of occupational diseases, industry hazard control and conducting audits in order to prevent or control occupational injury and promote wellness.

plusaPlanning and Implementing Health Behavior Changes Across Populations (3 credit hours)

This course explores the theoretical and practical approach of changing health behaviors of individuals and communities across populations and the impact to public health and the medical community if change does or does not occur. Focus will be on utilizing evidence-based practice to develop interventions and applications for both the community and the individual. Theoretical concepts will be integrated with practical application such as screenings, counseling, behavioral change and immunizations. Methods of communicating to various types of communities and culturally specific to individuals will be explored.

Emphasis in Infectious Disease Control Functional Area Content Courses

plusaFood and Water Borne Illnesses (3 credit hours)

This course discusses and gives a broad overview of food and waterborne diseases. Focus is on, diseases, disease processes, manifestations, reservoirs, transmission, epidemiology of microorganisms and chemical agents responsible for food and water-transmitted diseases and how surveillance is utilized to develop or improve policy. The ability of public health programs to regulate food and waterborne illnesses and to organize safe food and water supplies will be examined for both industrialized and developing countries.

plusaControl and Eradication of Global Infectious Diseases (3 credit hours)

Focus will be on the history of past and current eradication and or control campaigns of global infectious diseases. Epidemiological, sociological, political, cultural and ethical concerns of past and present eradication campaigns by both global entities and individual countries will be studied to determine barriers and advantages to these campaigns. Discussion will focus on current infectious disease candidates for eradication and possible campaign structure to accomplish eradication.

Healthcare Administration Functional Area Content Courses

plusaTheoretical Foundations of Leadership (3 credit hours)

Presents leadership concepts and theories, as well as an orientation to organizational structures and dynamics in health care delivery systems. Students examine theories and analyze environmental and societal determinants that influence an organization’s capacity for change and quality improvement. The complementary qualities of leadership and management are examined and their impact on organizational effectiveness and corporate success is analyzed. Interventions that advance and strengthen the organizational mission and vision are explored.

plusaHuman Resources and Workforce Development (3 credit hours)

Analyzes leadership roles in relation to decision-making with particular emphases on human resource management. Evidence-based staffing models are developed for the purpose of projecting and accurately documenting human resource requirements. Interviewing, hiring, orientation, and competency rubrics are examined and developed while the guidelines and statutes governing these human resource issues are explored. Conceptual aspects of control, problem solving/decision-making, effective communication, conflict resolution, progressive disciplinary action, delegation, and team building are applied to a variety of situational contexts.

plusaStrategic Planning and Financial Management (3 credit hours)

Introduces the concept of a strategic plan and the importance of linking this with an organization’s mission and ethos. Basic principles associated with program, project, and service line fiscal management, price-setting, budget preparation, return on investment, cost-benefit analysis, managed care contracting, and value-based purchasing are discussed and applied. Emphasis is placed on acquiring a financial vocabulary to communicate with various stakeholders. Financial reports such as balance sheets, budget forms, and expense reports are studied and formulated.

plusaQuality and Regulation Management (3 credit hours)

Integrates the concepts of outcomes management and research as the basis to improve the quality and effectiveness of health care organizations. Program evaluation, performance improvement, and other methods of measuring outcomes are examined for their utility within the health care setting. Systematic approaches for analyzing and evaluating processes of care delivery and their impact on client populations, organizational processes, and communities are considered. National quality data bases and national benchmarking is explored. Accreditation and/or regulatory requirements will be presented. Through readings, projects, and various interactions students develop an informed basis for leading quality improvement efforts in various healthcare settings.

plusaHealthcare Informatics, Database Management, and Financial Reimbursement (3 credit hours)

Provides an overview of healthcare informatics and its current use by both public and private healthcare agencies. Teaches students to navigate and enter data into complex healthcare databases using the principles of database management including the ability to conduct population studies through the use of databases. Explores the interpretation and evaluation of quality indicators within databases to maximize reimbursement in a variety of settings.

plusaApplied Research in Healthcare Administration (3 credit hours)

Integrates the knowledge, skills, and administration expertise gained throughout the MSN course of study in a cumulative research project that examines evidence-based practice in one area of healthcare administration, documents how this best practice could be actualized in the clinical setting, and how its implementation and results would be measured and analyzed. Also provides the student with the opportunity to visualize a specific project/ implementation and to evaluate it to gain a broader worldview and vision within healthcare administration. This course is taken during the last semester of the MSN program and is a prerequisite for Evidence-Based Practice in Healthcare Administration Practicum.

plusaEvidence-Based Practice in Healthcare Administration Practicum (3 credit hours)

Integrates the knowledge, skills, and administration expertise gained throughout the MSN course of study to culminate in this practice experience designed to further polish the administration professional’s role and skill set. The faculty and preceptor provide support and guidance to help interpret learning experiences, and to gain a broader worldview within organizational healthcare leadership. Emphasis is on the capacity of the emerging leader and administrator to implement evidence-based practice, facilitate advanced communication, and demonstrate one or more areas of effective leadership expertise. Students negotiate a leadership project to be completed during the practice experience. This course is completed during the student’s final module of MSN matriculation.

plusaHealthcare Law (3 credit hours)

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Healthcare Quality Management Functional Area Content Courses

plusaTheoretical Foundations of Leadership (3 credit hours)

Presents leadership concepts and theories, as well as an orientation to organizational structures and dynamics in health care delivery systems. Students examine theories and analyze environmental and societal determinants that influence an organization’s capacity for change and quality improvement. The complementary qualities of leadership and management are examined and their impact on organizational effectiveness and corporate success is analyzed. Interventions that advance and strengthen the organizational mission and vision are explored.

plusaHealthcare Informatics, Database Management, and Financial Reimbursement (3 credit hours)

Provides an overview of healthcare informatics and its current use by both public and private healthcare agencies. Teaches students to navigate and enter data into complex healthcare databases using the principles of database management including the ability to conduct population studies through the use of databases. Explores the interpretation and evaluation of quality indicators within databases to maximize reimbursement in a variety of settings

plusaRisk Management in Healthcare (3 credit hours)

Examines the history and trends of risk management in the United States. Provides education on achieving a risk-intelligent enterprise including oversight of regulatory requirements, compliance risk, understanding financial/business risk, advising organizational leaders on the management of new and existing risk, and assisting leaders with value protection and value creation. Presents methods of risk mitigation such as risk management, risk retention, risk modification, risk transfer, and error recovery to reduce risk. Incorporates the requirements necessary for healthcare organizations to achieve high reliability status.

plusaBuilding a Culture of Patient Safety (3 credit hours)

Defines interventions, and their employment, to drive change to proactively maintain patient safety within healthcare organizations. Identifies themes and patterns while examining organizational systems and processes for potential points of failure. Presents plans to implement guidelines and goals from national organizations including the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the National Quality Forum (NQF), and The Joint Commission (TJC) to enhance and assure patient safety throughout the care continuum.

plusaHealthcare Law (3 credit hours)

Examines the legal aspects of law as it relates to healthcare entities at the federal, state and local level. Methods to assure compliance with multiple regulatory agencies such as structural codes, wage and hour laws and medical billing will be explored. Specific attention will be paid to those statues that only mandate requirements for healthcare agencies.

plusaApplied Research in Healthcare Quality Management (3 credit hours)

Integrates the knowledge, skills, and healthcare quality management expertise gained throughout the MSN course of study in a cumulative research project that examines evidence-based practice in healthcare quality, documents how this best practice could be actualized in a healthcare organization, and how its implementation and results would be measured and analyzed. Also provides the student with the opportunity to visualize a specific project/implementation and to evaluate it to gain a broader worldview and vision within healthcare quality. This course is taken during the last semester of the MSN program and is a prerequisite for NURS 6583.

plusaEvidence-Based Practice in Healthcare Quality Practicum (3 credit hours)

Integrates the knowledge, skills, and healthcare quality management experience gained throughout the MSN course of study to culminate in this practice experience designed to further polish the quality manager’s professional role and skill set. The faculty and preceptor provide support and guidance to help interpret learning experiences, and to gain a broader worldview within a quality management framework. Emphasis is on the capacity of the emerging leader and quality management professional to implement evidence-based quality initiatives in healthcare organizations. The work will incorporate the application of current theories, and realize effective strategies in the design, implementation, and evaluation of this initiative while working with a preceptor and faculty advisor. Professional issues, quality and risk management trends, technological competencies, and self-assessment are incorporated into the course. This course is taken during the last semester of the MSN program after NURS 6573.

MSN Elective Courses

plusaTechnology in Nursing Education (3 credit hours)

Introduces students to the field of educational technology. Explores the historical and recent forces impacting educational technology and addresses the social and ethical issues surrounding acquiring, implementing, and evaluating technology in the learning environment. Best practices for distance education and alternative delivery modalities, which may be used in nursing education, are examined.

plusaEthics in Healthcare (3 credit hours)

Explores selected ethical theories related to health care and nursing practice. The history of ethical models in healthcare are examined as is the potential paradigm shift in ethical theory due to limited healthcare resources. Both institutional and broader health care policies related to ethical issues will be examined.

plusaSpirituality in Nursing (3 credit hours)

Emphasizes the importance of providing spiritual care as a component of holistic advanced nursing practice. Nursing’s historical foundation for the provision of spiritual care, as well as the vital and expansive role of spirituality/spiritual health promotion, will be explored. Students will be challenged to articulate their own spiritual philosophy, as well as identify the impact of and resources for personal spiritual renewal as a basic necessity in their current nursing practice. Practical applications and tools for spiritual formation will also be presented.

plusaCurrent Issues in Aging (3 credit hours)

Provides critical analysis of major social, economic, and political issues of growing old in America. Examines social policy in the public and private sectors including health, income, and social services and considers prospects for social change and political movements.

 

Professors

Name Email Phone Number
Susan Larson, PhD, RN
Professor of Nursing
Dean School of Nursing and Health Science
   
Karen Wiegman, PhD, RN
Associate Professor of Nursing
Department Chair Graduate Studies in Nursing
kdwiegman@mnu.edu 913-971-3839
Patricia Conejo, PhD, RN
Associate Professor of Nursing
Department Chair TBSN Program
peconejo@mnu.edu 913-971-3085
Deborah Highfill, PhD, RN
Associate Professor of Nursing
Department Chair ABSN Program
dmhighfill@mnu.edu 913-971-3837
Joanne McDermott, PhD(c), RN
Associate Professor of Nursing
jhmcdermott@mnu.edu 913-971-3836
Jason Robertson, MS, RN
Assistant Professor of Nursing
jerobertson@mnu.edu 913-971-3845
Gwen Wagner, MSN, RN, APRN
Assistant Professor of Nursing
ggwagner@mnu.edu 913-971-3834
Allyson Young, PhD(c), RN
Associate Professor of Nursing
Department Chair RN-BSN Program
aayoung@mnu.edu 913-971-3833
Kathryn Ballou, PhD, RN
Adjunct Professor
kaballou@mnu.edu 913-971-3831
Jacqueline Bartlett, PhD, RN
Adjunct Professor
jabartlett@mnu.edu 913-971-3831
Susan Chrisman, PhD, RN
Adjunct Professor
sechrisman@mnu.edu 913-971-3831
Douglas Copeland, MA
Adjunct Professor
dwcopeland@mnu.edu 913-971-3831
Catherine Gordon, MSN, RN, FNP-BC
Adjunct Professor
cagordon@mnu.edu 913-971-3831
Aimee McDonald, MSN, RN
Adjunct Professor
awmcdonald@mnu.edu 913-971-3831
Jane Peterson, PhD, RN
Adjunct Professor
jmpeterson@mnu.edu 913-971-3831
Mike Ramirez, MA
Assistant Professor of Education
mramirez@mnu.edu 913-971-3518
Cheryl Schmer, PhD, RN
Adjunct Professor
ceschmer@mnu.edu 913-971-3831
Peggy Ward-Smith, PhD, RN
Adjunct Professor
pawardsmith@mnu.edu 913-971-3831
 

Costs and Value of an MNU Education

We know that earning a master's degree is an investment in your future. The RN-MSN program is competitively priced and is a more affordable option than many other RN-MSN programs in the area. Even more valuable? The program is designed so that you can continue to work while attending class.

Credit Hours: 72 total
BSN Tuition: $365/credit hour*
MSN Tuition: $420/credit hour*

*Prices effective August 1, 2013.

We have different types of payment options available. Total cost, including fees and tuition, will be calculated based on your program, and can be divided into multiple payments. 

Group pricing is another option available for students enrolled in a program within Professional & Graduate Studies. Enroll as a group with your co-workers, friends or family members, or individuals from school, church or another type of organization. 

Group of 3-5 students = 5% off entire tuition
Group of 6-9 students = 10% off entire tuition 

The RN-MSN program at MidAmerica Nazarene University is approved for the Federal Direct Student Loan Program. Information and applications may be obtained from the Student Financial Services Office at (913) 971-3298 or  finaid@mnu.edu.

Questions? Contact us

MidAmerica Nazarene University
Student Financial Services
Campus Center Building
2030 E College Way
Olathe, KS 66062
Office Hours
Monday—Friday
8:00 a.m.—5 p.m. Central
Phone: 913-971-3298
Toll Free: 1-800-800-8887
Fax: 913-971-3482
Email: finaid@mnu.edu

Requirements & Prerequisites for RN-MSN Admission

RN-MSN
  • Registered Nurse with current RN license
  • Minimum cumulative 3.0 GPA
  • Two professional recommendations
  • General education requirements must be completed prior to start

 

 

Additional Information

Accreditation

The RN-MSN program at MNU is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nurse Education (CCNE; One Dupont circle, NW, Suite 530 Washington, DC  20036). Accreditation assures you of the credibility of the program for future nursing positions as well as for continued education in nursing.  Additionally, the University is authorized to offer associate’s degrees in all fields, bachelor’s degrees in all fields, and master’s degrees in the fields of Administration/Leadership, Business, Counseling, Education, Nursing and Religion. MNU was put on Notice by the Higher Learning Commission on February 28, 2012. The University remains accredited while on Notice.


Outcomes

The faculty of the School of Nursing seeks to continue the development of the student on the seven General Education Outcomes of the University. Graduate Nursing Students demonstrate competency in these outcomes prior to graduation. The outcomes, their definitions, and their defining characteristics relative to a master of science degree in nursing are:

plusaAesthetic Literacy

The application of caring and creativity in nursing, the “finest art” (Nightingale, as cited in Donahue, 1985, p. 469). By graduation the MSN student will evidence aesthetic literacy by:

  1. directing the nursing care of a group of patients either directly or indirectly that demonstrates caring, compassion, and respect for dignity (Health Care Administration track) OR educating others to provide nursing care in a caring, compassionate and dignified manner (Nursing Education track);
  2. assuming the role of advocate for consumers and change agent within the healthcare system.
  3. demonstrating a personalized expression of the art of nursing;
  4. utilizing an aesthetic approach in selected projects, presentations, and nursing care;
  5. recognizing the aesthetic component of human responses/interactions; and,
  6. demonstrating a sensitivity and respect for the diversity of human experience encouraging individual patient expression of values, preferences, and needs.

 

plusaCritical Thinking

The application of current research, theory, professional standards, and ethical codes to influence the ongoing generation and evaluation of creative ideas for the purpose of solving patient, family, and/or community health issues/concerns/problems. By graduation the RN-MSN student will evidence critical thinking by:

  1. utilizing new knowledge to analyze the outcomes of nursing interventions, to initiate change, and to improve practice;
  2. comprehending the economic implications of health planning, the organization of personnel and resources, the design of payment systems, and the outcome analysis of healthcare delivery or cost effectiveness of services;
  3. evaluating ethical decision-making from both a personal and organizational perspective and developing an understanding of how these two perspectives might create conflicts of interests;
  4. critiquing and evaluating a variety of theories from nursing and related fields;
  5. incorporating theories and research in generating teaching and counseling strategies to promote and preserve health and healthy lifestyles in all populations.
  6. identifying credible, authoritative sources and properly citing relevant, essential information encountered in the exploration of complex issues;
  7. integrating best current evidence with key clinical concepts and individual patient preferences and values to promote clinical reasoning and the delivery of safe, individualized care;
  8. monitoring and evaluating the outcomes of care;
  9. identifying necessary changes that will enhance the quality and safety of care;
  10. functioning as a team member to generate criteria, data, and solutions;
  11. critically appraising the effects of personal and professional actions with respect to their impact on the nurse’s integrity and ethical imperatives;
  12. demonstrating adaptability and flexibility in one’s approach to managing competing and ever changing priorities in complex healthcare environments; and
  13. demonstrating a commitment to life-long learning and scholarship to heighten the quality of nursing practice.

 

plusaEffective Communication

The ability to clearly interact with individuals and/or groups for the purpose of sharing information, ideas, and/or emotions. By graduation the MSN student will evidence effective communication by:

  1. using computer applications, to understand statistical and research methodologies;
  2. writing and communicating effectively;
  3. articulating the interaction between regulatory controls and quality control within the healthcare delivery system;
  4. interpreting healthcare research for consumers and officials;
  5. identifying areas in which personal conflict of interest might arise and proposing resolutions or actions to resolve the conflict;
  6. communicating with, developing professional relationships with and working in collaboration with other professionals;
  7. negotiating one’s roles within the practice system;
  8. fostering a multidisciplinary approach to discuss strategies and garner multifaceted resources to empower client populations in attaining and maintaining functional wellness.
  9. functioning effectively with students, faculty, patients, family members, nursing and inter-professional teams; and fostering open communication, mutual respect, and shared decision-making to achieve quality patient care;
  10. using information and technology to communicate and manage knowledge, mitigate error, and support decision-making;
  11. valuing continuous improvement of one’s own communication and conflict resolution skills;
  12. managing conflict and negotiating equitable solutions with others; and,
  13. demonstrating openness and cultural competence to facilitate nurse-patient communication and inter-professional collaboration.

 

plusaScientific Literacy

The acquisition of nursing’s unique body of knowledge and an understanding of the processes by which that knowledge was achieved and can be developed. By graduation the MSN student will evidence scientific literacy by:

  1. accessing current and relevant data needed to answer questions identified in one’s nursing practice;
  2. initiating a line of inquiry into comprehensive databases in order to utilize available research in the practice of nursing;
  3. analyzing the results of policy research relevant to health care delivery;
  4. understanding how various healthcare delivery systems are organized.
  5. using basic principles of fiscal management and budgeting and health economics in practice;
  6. analyzing and monitoring the cost-effectiveness of clinical decisions and making recommendations for increasing the cost-effectiveness of care;
  7. evaluating ethical methods of decision-making and engaging in an ethical decision-making process.
  8. applying and utilizing appropriate theories from nursing and related fields to provide high quality health care.
  9. using epidemiological, social and environmental data to draw inferences regarding the health status of client populations and communities.
  10. integrating knowledge from physical and social sciences with evidence-based nursing knowledge and patient preferences to provide safe, individualized, quality nursing care;
  11. continuously expanding personal nursing knowledge and effectiveness by integrating nursing research and theory into clinical practice;
  12. identifying the importance of nursing’s unique, evidence-based body of knowledge and the ethical processes by which that knowledge is developed;
  13. demonstrating evidence of being a knowledgeable consumer of scholarly nursing research; and,
  14. gathering and sharing credible data and information that will assist in solving problems, expanding nursing knowledge, and improving patient outcomes.

 

plusaSelf-Understanding

The self-application of physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual health promotion practices, as the basis of knowledge that will enhance the provision of holistic care to others. By graduation the MSN student will evidence self-understanding by:

  1. practicing in collaboration with a multicultural work force;
  2. actualizing/implementing the advance practice roles of teach, researcher, advocate, clinician, consultant, collaborator and manager of systems;
  3. identifying and analyzing common ethical dilemmas and the ways in which these dilemmas impact self and others.
  4. recognizing personal attitudes regarding others’ ethnic, cultural, spiritual, and social backgrounds and committing to value the infinite worth of all;
  5. demonstrating a commitment to life-long learning and continual self-assessment to achieve one’s highest potential;
  6. demonstrating caring and respectful attitudes and behaviors while interacting ethically and compassionately with others; and,
  7. recognizing areas of growth potential and seeking resources for self-development and improvement

 

plusaSocial Responsibility

The personal involvement of self in nursing’s role and responsibilities to people and society. By graduation the MSN student will evidence social responsibility by:

  1. ensuring that systems meet the needs of the population(s) served and are culturally relevant;
  2. differentiating and delineating legislative and regulatory processes;
  3. evaluating local, state and national health policy issues and trends;
  4. articulating health care issues/concerns to elected and appointed officials and to healthcare consumers;
  5. serving as a consumer advocate on health issues;
  6. providing leadership in the healthcare delivery system;
  7. demonstrating fiscal accountability for one’s own practice while providing quality care;
  8. assuming accountability for the quality of one’s own practice;
  9. advocating for the nursing profession;
  10. influencing regulatory, legislative and public policy in private and public arenas to promote and preserve healthy communities.
  11. demonstrating personal responsibility for exhibiting qualities of professionhood:
    1. Advocacy
    2. Autonomy
    3. Service orientation
    4. Self-regulation
    5. Ethical and legal behavior
    6. Knowledge acquisition
    7. Participation in nursing activities/organizations
    8. Leadership and management skills
  12. providing safe, effective, and holistic nursing care to developmentally and socio-culturally diverse patients, families, and communities locally and globally;
  13. accepting the professional and personal responsibility in seeking lifelong, continuous learning of information technology skills that support clinical decision-making, error prevention, and care coordination; and,
  14. respecting patients’ rights to personal healthcare records while protecting confidentiality.

 

plusaSpiritual Development

The cultivation of a Christian approach to one’s life and professional nursing practice that permeates the student’s attainment of School of Nursing outcomes. By graduation the MSN student will evidence spiritual development by:

  1. integrating faith with learning and nursing practice.
  2. demonstrating social justice in their interactions with others.
  3. acknowledging and/or demonstrating an appreciation of the role of the Christian world view in promoting holistic health of self and others;
  4. supporting patients with differing moral-ethical and cultural values through mutual respect and shared decision-making; and,
  5. recognizing and providing for the spiritual needs of patients, families, and interdisciplinary team members in a thoughtful and caring manner.

 

 

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